Xaverian Dramatics

proudly presents

THE CRUCIBLE

ARTHUR MILLER'S

The Xaverian Performing Arts Center

FRIDAY
NOV. 19
7:00 PM

SATURDAY
NOV. 20
7:00 PM

SUNDAY
NOV. 21
2:00 PM

The Crucible focuses upon a young farmer, his wife, and a young servant-girl who maliciously causes the wife’s arrest for witchcraft. The farmer brings the girl to court to admit the lie — and it is here that the monstrous course of bigotry and deceit is terrifyingly depicted.

Inspired by the Salem Witch Trials and influenced by the Red Scare, Arthur Miller's chilling classic is one of the most recognized and often produced plays in American Theater.

There is a use of strobe lights in the first scene.

The performance is roughly 2 and a half hours
with a 15-minute intermission.


Setting
Salem, MA
The Spring of 1692


Prologue
The Woods outside of Salem
Midnight


Act I
Reverend Parris' Home
The Next Morning


Act II
The Proctors' Home
Eight Days Later


Epilogue
Salem Jail
The Same Night


~Intermission~

Act III
The Salem Meeting House
Two Weeks Later


Act VI
Salem Jail
Three Months Later

 

Director's Note

"A wild thing may say wild things!" is spoken early in our play by Abigail Williams, an incredibly complicated character. She's part antagonist, part victim; her soul may be lost to Satan, or maybe she's just amoral. Abgail is just one of the many complicated characters you'll encounter tonight.

You'll also meet Elizabeth Proctor, a wife struggling her husband's betrayal; you'll meet Rebecca Nurse, described as "the most pious woman in Salem"; you'll also meet Thomas Danforth, a judge blinded by his own definition of right and wrong; and you'll meet Samuel Parris, a man who only knows how to serve his own interests. It may be 1692 in Salem, but we all know people

Our conversations during rehearsals have touched on how these people, seemingly from a strange and different time, aren't all that different from us today. We're all Abigail and Elizabeth, Proctor and Parris, Nurse and Danforth. We hope our production shows you what we're all capable of: the good and the "wild."


                                                                                -J.S.